Georgian Conservatories.

 

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This style of conservatory is one of our most popular conservatory choices because its square shape makes the most of the space available, while proving great value for money. This option is a slightly more modern take on the classic Victorian conservatory as the vaulted roof gives you a real sense of space. Edwardian and Georgian conservatories add a unique heritage look to your home and feature the most modern technology so you and your family are safe, warm and have a wonderful living space all year around.

Take a look at other styles of conservatories

Edwardian Conservatory

Edwardian (or Georgian) conservatories are quite similar in style to the Victorian, and also feature an apexed roof. However the main difference is that Edwardian conservatories are square or rectangular on plan, so they have a flat front (compared to the Victorian angle front). When it comes to choosing the right Summit conservatory, there are so many decisions to make and questions to ask.

Victorian Conservatory

Victorian conservatories are the most popular styles of conservatory in England, Victorian style complements most types of property. Victorian conservatories are especially popular on all homes, which contains some of the finest Victorian architecture in the country. Victorian conservatories traditionally have 3 or 5 facets on their front elevation, and ornate detailing along the ridge of the roof.

P-Shaped Conservatory

P shaped conservatories are so called because they have a P shaped plan with an apexed roof. P shaped conservatories are sometimes called Combination conservatories due to the fact that they allow you to combine two different styles of conservatory, such as an Edwardian and a Lean To. It is also possible to adapt an existing style into different basic layouts, including a T-shape or a B-shape.

Orangery Conservatory

While some may look similar to a conservatory, there are some very distinct differences. Orangeries are more akin to extensions than conservatories. They generally do not have a door dividing the extension to the main part of the house. You may have a door, perhaps a high quality bi-fold door, but the general idea is that part of you house is seamlessly extended into this new glass building with an atrium style roof.